Tightrope Books

Monster, by David Livingstone Clink

By Tightrope Books | March 8th, 2011 | Print This Post | Email This Post | Leave a Comment

Monster, by David Livingstone ClinkAre we humans or monsters?

David Clink’s collection of Canadian Gothic and post-punk poems explore the ideas of dank despair with a light playfulness.

These poems will crawl and scratch themselves under your skin, with themes and subjects such as elder abuse, infidelity, molestation, murder, suicide, serial killers and shapeshifters, six-legged dogs and bodies hanging from barn rafters, spiderwebs and fallen cities, steampunk airships muscling into the night. These carnivalesque poems create a dark world of the strange and unusual portraying a shady landscape of murder, decay and aliens.

From his poems “‘Beauty and Darkness”, “206 Bones and the Landscape It Moves In” to “Oceanus Procellarum” David Clink ventures deeper and darker into the shadows of the mind.
For more information about David Clink’s Monster please visit the Tightrope Book catalogue.

“The Soldier”, by David Livingstone Clink published on Roccodg.com

By Tightrope Books | February 25th, 2011 | Print This Post | Email This Post | Leave a Comment

Monster, by David Livingstone ClinkDavid Livingstone Clink has a poem reproduced on Roccodg.com, “The Soldier“.

From the poem:

If he could speak he’d ask for some food, some water, and you’d invite him in. Taking off his boots and putting his feet up, he’d sip lemonade with you on the back porch. He’d talk about where he grew up, which sports he played, and the women he knew.

The poem is from his latest collection, Monster.

For more information about Monster or to purchase the book, please click here.

David Livingstone Clink interviewed for Northumberland Today

By Tightrope Books | February 24th, 2011 | Print This Post | Email This Post | Leave a Comment

Monster, by David Livingstone ClinkDavid Livingstone Clink was interviewed for Northumberland Today about a recent reading, and they discuss his latest book, Monster.

From the interview:

Reflecting on poems he never wrote, Clink says the act of not writing might be poetry in itself. He has not yet produced every grim thing that he could write.

“Poems that one would choose not to write would be ones where one is not ready to tackle the subject matter,” he says. “There are some incidents in my life that I may someday put down to paper.”

Click to read an excerpt from Monster, “Oceanus Procellarum“.